Call for Abstract

Acadamia
  • University of Florida, USA
  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Canada
  • University of Guelph, Canada
  • University in Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Universidad Abierta Interamericana, Argentina
  • Universidad Santo Tomás, Chile
  • IDEA-ICGEB, Venezuela 
  • UNISINOS, Brazil
  • Helmholtz Cetre for Infection Research, Germany
  • Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Germany 
  • Gamaleya Institute of Epidemology and Microbiology, Russia
  • Coburg University, Germany
  • University of Latvia, Latvia
  • Ghent Univerty, Belgium
  • CEA-INAC, France
  • University of Leige, Belgium
  • Charité-universitätsmedizin, Berlin
  • Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Norway
  • USAT, Montserrat
  • Orenburg University, Russia
  • University of South Australia, Australia
  • Sunway University, Malaysia
  • University Sains, Malaysia
  • Southwest University, China
  • The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
  • National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, South Korea
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
  • University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague
  • Cairo University, Egypt
  • Alexandria University, Egypt
  • National Research Centre, Egypt
  • Menoufia University, Egypt
  • Sheba Medical Centre, Egypt 
  • The Hashemite University, Jordan
  • Istanbul Kemerburgaz University, Turkey 
  • Kind Saud Bin Abdul Aziz University, Saudi Arabia
  • King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia
  • King Saud University, Saudi Arabia
  • Yerevan State University, Armenia
  • Pasteur Institute of Iran, Iran
  • Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, Tanzania
  • North West University, South Africa
  • Tshwane University of Technology, South Africa
  • University of Fort Hare, South Africa
  • University of Yaounde, Cameroon
  • IGIB-CSIR, India
  • CFTRI, India
  • University of Delhi, India
  • National Institute for Tuberculosis Research, India
  • NUST, Pakistan
  •  
Business
  • Sigma Aldrich
  • Garland Science (Taylor and Francis Group)
  • AMOREPACIFIC CORPORATIONR&D CENTER
  • BIOspektrum_Springer
  • Trillium (Medizinischer Fachverlag)
  •  

World Congress and Expo on Applied Microbiology, will be organized around the theme “State-of-the-art Trends in Applied Microbial Industries, Biotech and Pharmaceuticals”

Applied Microbiology-2015 is comprised of 18 tracks and 218 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Applied Microbiology-2015.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

The field of modern aliment microbiology, includes recent developments in the procedures used to assay and control microbiological quality in food. It covers the three main themes of the interaction of micro-organisms with victuals-spoilage, foodborne illness and victuals fermentation and gives balanced attention to both the positive and negative aspects which result. It additionally discusses the factors affecting the presence of micro-organisms in foods, as well as their capacity to survive and grow. Microbes accommodate many utilizable purposes to humans. We utilize them inside our bodies with natural digestion processes. We additionally utilize them in industry and pabulum engenderment, like dairy products. Aliment like cheese, pickles, chocolate, bread, wine, potation and soy sauce are all made with the avail of variants of bacteria and yeast. In most of these pabulum products, bacteria play a major role because they engender lactic acid. Fermentation of pabulum is commonly used to process pabulum for making potations, leavening of bread and preserving foods. We have 100 trillion microbes in our gut—more bacteria than cells in the body. They avail in digestion and detoxification, avail support our immune system, and manufacture key vitamins, among other functions. We incline to cerebrate of microbes as lamentable pathogens that need to be killed but incipient research suggests that storing scores of them is paramount to our health and metabolism. One of the most paramount things microbes do for us is to avail with digestion. The commix of microbes in your gut can affect how well you utilize and store energy from victuals. Food safety is a public health priority; millions of people fall ill every year and many die as a result of victualing unsafe pabulum. Solemn outbreaks of foodborne disease have been documented on every continent in the past decade, and in many countries rates of illnesses are increment significantly.
  • Track 1-1Fermented foods and beverages
  • Track 1-2Organic nutrition
  • Track 1-3Probiotics and Prebiotics
  • Track 1-4Polyphenols, carotenoids, phytochemicals and antioxidants
  • Track 1-5Food chemistry and biochemistry in food processing
  • Track 1-6Trends in modern food processing
  • Track 1-7Detection & identification of natural toxins
  • Track 1-8Food processing industries and practices
  • Track 1-9Food toxicology and microbiology: Spoilage prevention and control
  • Track 1-10Nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics
  • Track 1-11Dynamics and functions of microbial consortia
  • Track 1-12Single cell microbiology
  • Track 1-13Impact of food microbiota on human health
  • Track 1-14Risk assessment and risk management to insure food safety
  • Track 1-15Epidemiology of foodborne pathogens along the food chain
  • Track 1-16Spoilage microorganisms
  • Track 1-17Clinical importance of probiotics
Industrial microbiology is primarily associated with the commercial exploitation of microorganisms, and involves processes and products that are of major economic, environmental and gregarious consequentiality throughout the world. There are two key aspects of industrial microbiology, the first relating to engenderment of valuable microbial products via fermentation processes. These include traditional fermented foods and beverages, such as bread, potation, cheese and wine, which have been engendered for thousands of years. In additament, over the last hundred years or so, microorganisms have been further employed in the engenderment of numerous chemical feedstock, energy sources, enzymes, aliment ingredients and pharmaceuticals. The second aspect is the role of microorganisms in providing accommodations, particularly for waste treatment and pollution control, which utilizes their abilities to degrade virtually all natural and man-made products. However, such activities must be controlled while these materials are in utilization, otherwise consequent bio deterioration leads to major economic loses, and Industrial microorganisms are mundanely cultivated under rigorously controlled conditions developed to optimize the magnification of the organism or engenderment of a target microbial product. The synthesis of microbial metabolites is conventionally tightly regulated by the microbial cell. Consequently, in order to obtain high yields, the environmental conditions that trigger regulatory mechanisms, particularly repression and feedback inhibition, must be evaded. Fermentations are performed in astronomically immense fermenters often with capacities of several thousand litres. These range from simple tanks, which may be stirred or unstirred, to intricate integrated systems involving varying levels of computer control. The fermenter and associated pipework, etc., must be constructed of materials, conventionally stainless steel, that can be perpetually sterilized and that will not react adversely with the microorganisms or with the target products. The mode of fermenter operation (batch, victualed-batch or perpetual systems), the method of its aeration and agitation, where indispensable, and the approach taken to process scale-up have major influences on fermentation performance.
  • Track 2-1New approaches in enzyme and microbial technology
  • Track 2-2In-silico tools to analyze proteins
  • Track 2-3Pharmacogenomics and pharmacoproteomics
  • Track 2-4Function prediction methods
  • Track 2-5Recombinant protein expressions
  • Track 2-6Protein profiling and designer proteins
  • Track 2-7Protein identification and validation
  • Track 2-8Commercial enzymes of industrial standards
  • Track 2-9Protein turnover
  • Track 2-10Protein targeting
  • Track 2-11Amino acid modifications
  • Track 2-12Post-translational modifications: Protein folding
  • Track 2-13Algorithms and fast profiling
Microbes permeate the entire food and agricultural process. While the most visible role of agriculture is probably that of producing and delivering food, microbiology is critical to other agricultural sectors as well, e.g., for production of energy and for bioremediation of agricultural wastes. Some microorganisms are a constant source of trouble for agricultural endeavours, while others are an integral part of successful food production. Microbial influences on food and agriculture have produced both advancements and disasters that have punctuated human history. Some examples of microbe-driven outcomes set the stage for describing how important it is to seize research opportunities in food and agriculture microbiology, The relationship of microbes to the human food supply also includes many examples of organisms that preserve rather than destroy. Early Mediterranean societies discovered that fermentation could be used to help create yogurt and cheese from dairy products. These products were flavourful, safe, and could be stored for extended periods of time.
  • Track 3-1Spatial ecology, biogeography and land use
  • Track 3-2Nitrogen transformations
  • Track 3-3Physiological and biochemical methods for studying soil biota and their function
  • Track 3-4Carbon cycling And formation of soil organic matter
  • Track 3-5The ecology of plant–microbial mutualisms
  • Track 3-6Green synthesis of nanoparticles
  • Track 3-7Microbial quorum sensing and biofilms
  • Track 3-8Metal-Microbe interactions
  • Track 3-9Rhizobiology and immunology
  • Track 3-10Biofertilizers and biopesticides
  • Track 3-11Maintenance of biological equilibrium
  • Track 3-12Bioengineering soil sustainability
  • Track 3-13Biophysical processes affecting the life of soil microbes
  • Track 3-14Structural and functional soil microbial diversity
  • Track 3-15Management of organisms and their processes in soils
Biodegradation is nature's way of recycling wastes, or breaking down organic matter into nutrients that can be used by other organisms. "Degradation" means decay, and the "bio-" prefix means that the decay is carried out by a huge assortment of bacteria, fungi, insects, worms, and other organisms that eat dead material and recycle it into new forms. In nature, there is no waste because everything gets recycled. The waste products from one organism become the food for others, providing nutrients and energy while breaking down the waste organic matter. Some organic materials will break down much faster than others, but all will eventually decay. By harnessing these natural forces of biodegradation, people can reduce wastes and clean up some types of environmental contaminants. Through composting, we accelerate natural biodegradation and convert organic wastes to a valuable resource. Wastewater treatment also accelerates natural forces of biodegradation. In this case the purpose is to break down organic matter so that it will not cause pollution problems when the water is released into the environment. Through bioremediation, microorganisms are used to clean up oil spills and other types of organic pollution. Composting and bioremediation provide many possibilities for student research. Remediate" means to solve a problem, and "bio-remediate" means to use biological organisms to solve an environmental problem such as contaminated soil or groundwater. In a non-polluted environment, bacteria, fungi, protists, and other microorganisms are constantly at work breaking down organic matter, some of the microorganisms would die, while others capable of eating the organic pollution would survive. Bioremediation works by providing these pollution-eating organisms with fertilizer, oxygen, and other conditions that encourage their rapid growth. These organisms would then be able to break down the organic pollutant at a correspondingly faster rate. In fact, bioremediation is often used to help clean up oil spills. Nonetheless, bioremediation provides a technique for cleaning up pollution by enhancing the same biodegradation processes that occur in nature. Depending on the site and its contaminants, bioremediation may be safer and less expensive than alternative solutions such as incineration or landfilling of the contaminated materials. It also has the advantage of treating the contamination in place so that large quantities of soil, sediment or water do not have to be dug up or pumped out of the ground for treatment.
  • Track 4-1Bacterial bioremediation
  • Track 4-2Microbiologically influenced corrosion
  • Track 4-3Biofilms and biofouling
  • Track 4-4Biotransformation and biodegradation of hazardous compounds
  • Track 4-5Biodeterioration and biodegradation of wood and polymeric materials
  • Track 4-6Recycling of nutrients, waste and pollution
  • Track 4-7Biodegradation and bioremediation of persistent pollutants
  • Track 4-8Biodiversity of organisms involved in biodeterioration
  • Track 4-9Bioremediation in environmental protection
Microbial ecology is the study of microbes in the environment and their interactions with each other. Microbes are the tiniest creatures on Earth, yet despite their small size, they have a huge impact on us and on our environment. Microbial ecology can show us our place in the cosmos -- how life originated and how it evolved, and how we are related to the great diversity of all other organisms. The study of microbial ecology can help us improve our lives via the use of microbes in environmental restoration, food production, and bioengineering of useful products such as antibiotics, food supplements, and chemicals. The study of these bizarre and diverse creatures that are everywhere yet nowhere to be seen is fascinating and a pursuit that appeals to the curiosity and playfulness in us. Most types of microbes remain unknown. It is estimated that we know fewer than 1% of the microbial species on Earth. Yet microbes surround us everywhere -- air, water, soil. An average gram of soil contains one billion (1,000,000,000) microbes representing probably several thousand species. Estimated 1,000,000 bacterial species exist on this planet, according to the Global Biodiversity Assessment, yet fewer than 4500 have been described. The greatest genetic diversity of life comes from within the world of microorganisms, yet the least is known about them. Marine microbiology is the study of microorganisms and non-organismic microbes that exist in saltwater environments, including the open ocean, coastal waters, estuaries, on marine surfaces and in sediments, they have complicated identities marine microbiology deals with all very small life and life-like biological phenomena: non-organismic microbes, bacteria, Archaea, protozoans, single-celled algae and very small multicellular plants, fungi, and animals. Marine microbiology isn't just for the open ocean. It's also concerned with microbial communities in coastal waters and estuaries, where saltwater meets fresh. Marine microorganisms are additionally found on maritime surfaces, such as sea cliffs splashed with ocean spray, and in sediments. Marine microorganisms rarely exist alone. Rather, they combine into communities, where they often depend on one another for food. These communities join with other small life forms, including the larvae of many invertebrates and fish, to form the enormous living waves of plankton that marine microorganisms, from tiny filter-feeding invertebrates to gigantic whales, depend on for food. Many marine microorganisms are mix trophic, which means they can behave either like plants or like animals by switching between photosynthesis on the one hand, and devouring other microorganisms on the other.
  • Track 5-1Marine ecosystems
  • Track 5-2Biogeochemical process in the sea
  • Track 5-3Marine microbes and their role in carbon fixation
  • Track 5-4Marine pharmaceutical pipelines
  • Track 5-5Natural products application
  • Track 5-6Bioactive compounds, pigments, fatty acids, enzymes, and antioxidants
  • Track 5-7Marine microbial resources
  • Track 5-8Biosynthetic pathways of deep see hot vent microorganisms
  • Track 5-9Protein and genetic expressions
  • Track 5-10Microbial diversity of hot vents and deep sea habitats
  • Track 5-11Functional diversity of microbial groups
  • Track 5-12Microbial interactions
  • Track 5-13Modern marine industries and applications
Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical paramount of such isolates. It provides comprehensive information on the identification of different bacteria and outlines recent vicissitudes in taxonomy. Bacterial profiling is the relegation of bacteria predicated on experiments, resulting expeditious identification. This system is developed for expeditious identification of clinically germane bacteria and hence only kenned bacteria can be identified. The predominant proteomic technologies that have been explored for bacterial identification and characterization include matrix-availed laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS); electro spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS); surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) mass spectrometry; one- or two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE); or the coalescence of mass spectrometry, gel electrophoresis, and bioinformatics. In the context of plants, two symbiotic systems have been actively studied for many years. One is arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis and the other is root nodule (RN) symbiosis. Oral bacteria have evolved mechanisms to sense their environment and eschew or modify the host. Bacteria occupy the ecological niche provided by both the tooth surface and gingival epithelium. There is evidence of bacteria resistant to both biocides and antibiotics occurring in hospitals, and this resistance can be transferred to other bacterial strains. The plasmids can be transferred between prokaryotes through horizontal gene transfer.
  • Track 6-1Insights And Trends In Clinical Microbiology
  • Track 6-2Microbioal Genomics and Metagenomics
  • Track 6-3Nanopatches and nanovaccination
  • Track 6-4Diagnosis And Detection Of Viral infections
  • Track 6-5Public Health And Community-Acquired Infections
  • Track 6-6Genome Plasticity And Infectious Diseases
  • Track 6-7Clinical Immunology: Autoimmunity And Autoimmune Diseases
  • Track 6-8Clinical Veterinary Microbiology
  • Track 6-9Veterinary Diseases And Epidemiology
  • Track 6-10Medical Parasitology
  • Track 6-11Mycotoxicology
  • Track 6-12Parasitology And Mycology
  • Track 6-13Clinical Virology and Bacteriology
  • Track 6-14Recent Breakthrough in Infectious Diseases (Ebola,Parasitic infections, Zoonotic Diseases,Scarlet Fever, Influenza)
  • Track 6-15Detection Technologies and MolecularDiagnosis
  • Track 7-1Geo Dynamics
  • Track 7-2Microbial Reduction of Azo Dyes
  • Track 7-3Biogeochemistry of metals and pollutants
  • Track 7-4Microbial Reduction of Iron
  • Track 7-5Nano particles and colloids
  • Track 7-6Biogeochemistry of radioactive waste and isotopes
Water is essential to life. An adequate, safe and accessible supply must be available to all. Improving access to safe drinking-water can result in significant benefits to health. Every effort should be made to achieve a drinking water quality as safe as possible. Many people struggle to obtain access to safe water. A clean and treated water supply to each house may be the norm in Europe and North America, but in developing countries, access to both clean water and sanitation are not the rule, and waterborne infections are common. Two and a half billion people have no access to improved sanitation, and more than 1.5 million children die each year from diarrheal diseases .According to the WHO, the mortality of water associated diseases exceeds 5 million people per year. From these, more that 50% are microbial intestinal infections, with cholera standing out in the first place. The greatest microbial risks are associated with ingestion of water that is contaminated with human or animal feces. Wastewater discharges in fresh waters and costal seawaters are the major source of fecal microorganisms, including pathogens.
  • Track 8-1Exposure
  • Track 8-2Safety and Pollution Control
  • Track 8-3Health Illness, Risks and Hazards
  • Track 8-4Different sources of Water
  • Track 8-5Treatment for water borne diseases
  • Track 8-6Water management and treatment
  • Track 8-7Diseases caused by water pollution
  • Track 8-8Water Borne Diseases
  • Track 9-1Recent trends in detection of microbial toxins
  • Track 9-2Basic research on microarraying
  • Track 9-3Carbohydrate arrays
  • Track 9-4Clinical utility of gene expression signatures
  • Track 9-5DNA microarrays vs next-generation sequencing
  • Track 9-6In-situ production of protein arrays
  • Track 9-7Microarray analysis for preimplantation diagnostics
  • Track 9-8Novel technology developments & new directions
  • Track 9-9Pre- & post-natal chromosomal microarray analysis
  • Track 9-10Protein arrays in clinical practice
  • Track 9-11RNA analysis
  • Track 9-12Biodetection and biosensors
  • Track 9-13Laboratory diagnosis of human parasitic infections
  • Track 9-14Contributions of imaging techniques
  • Track 9-15Methods for antibacterial susceptibility testing
  • Track 9-16Biomarker tools in microbial diagnosis
  • Track 9-17Nanotechnology in microbial and viral detection
  • Track 9-18Advances in qPCR and dPCR
  • Track 9-19Bioanalytical Sensors
  • Track 9-20Centrifugal Microfluidics
  • Track 9-21Developments in label free detection
  • Track 9-22Market orientated device development
  • Track 9-23Clinical Applications of Mass Spectrometry
  • Track 9-24Circulating biomarkers
Pharmaceutical Microbiology is an applied branch of Microbiology. It involves the study of microorganisms associated with the manufacture of pharmaceuticals e.g. minimizing the number of microorganisms in a process environment, omitting microorganisms and microbial by-products like exotoxin and endotoxin from water and other starting materials, and ascertaining the culminated pharmaceutical product is sterile Other aspects of pharmaceutical microbiology include the research and development of anti-infective agents, the utilization of microorganisms to detect mutagenic and carcinogenic activity in prospective drugs, and the utilization of microorganisms in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products like insulin and human magnification hormone. Pharmaceutical microbiologists are required to assess cleanrooms and controlled environments for contamination (viable and particulate) and to introduce contamination control strategies. This includes a construal of peril assessment. . While inoculation of human pathogenic bacteria, fungi or viruses poses the most conspicuous peril to the patient, it should additionally be realized that microorganisms conventionally regarded as non-pathogenic which inadvertently gain access to body cavities in sufficiently astronomically immense numbers can withal result in an astringent, often fatal, infection. Consequently, injections, ophthalmic preparations, irrigation fluids, dialysis solutions, sutures and ligatures, implants, certain surgical dressings, as well as instruments indispensable for their utilization or administration, must be presented for use in a sterile condition and in such a way that they remain sterile throughout the period of avail. Principles of the methods employed to sterilize pharmaceutical products are autoclaving and filtration as opportune methods applicable to aqueous liquids, and dry heat for nonaqueous and dry solid preparations.
  • Track 11-1Biotechnology and liquid biofuel production
  • Track 11-2Innovative biorefineries concepts for various industries
  • Track 11-3Production plant management
  • Track 11-4Thermal, chemical & biochemical techniques for biomass conversion
  • Track 11-5Crops for biodiesel production
  • Track 11-6Applications & environmental impact of biodiesel
  • Track 11-7Biodiesel as automobile fuel
  • Track 11-8Market potential of biogas reactors
  • Track 11-9Large scale biogas production & challenges
  • Track 11-10Commercialization of algae biofuels
  • Track 11-11Algae harvesting and oil extraction systems
  • Track 11-12Generations of bioalcohols & scope of advancement
Virology is the study of viruses – submicroscopic, parasitic particles of genetic material contained in a protein coat and virus-like agents. Virology is often considered a part of microbiology or of pathology. Viruses and viral diseases have been at the centers of science, agriculture, and medicine for millennia and some of our greatest challenges and triumphs have involved virology. Virology 2015 addresses and discuss on the recent advancements and technologies being used and developed for the research on viruses. Virology is considered to be a subfield of microbiology or of medicine. The Global microbiology market is growing due to increase in prevalence of pathogenic diseases, growth in discovery of mutating and adapting bacterium, and the growing need for speedy microbiological testing methods. The report Global Microbiology Market forecast for 2018’ analyzes the market by segments such as instruments and reagents. These two segments experienced a positive growth till 2013, with a market value of $3.55 billion, comprising of $2.99 billion for reagents and $0.55 billion for instruments. It is expected to grow at a CAGR of 6.2%.The Americas commanded the largest share 42% of the Global Microbiology Market at an estimated $1485.02 million in 2013 and are expected to reach $1932.8 million by 2018, at a CAGR of 5.6% from 2013 to 2018. The report “North American Microbiology Market forecast for 2018 “analyzes the market by two segments such as instruments and reagents. Atlanta is the capital of Georgia and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Georgia, with an estimated population of 447,841 in 2014. Atlanta is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta metropolitan area, home to 5,522,942 people and the ninth largest metropolitan area in the United States. The Atlanta metropolitan area is the eighth-largest economy in the country and 17th-largest in the world.Atlanta is the primary transportation hub of the Southeastern United States, via highway, railroad, and air, with Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport being the world's busiest airport since 1998.
  • Track 13-1Poly-microbial biofilms
  • Track 13-2Social interactions in biofilm
  • Track 13-3Fungal biofilms
  • Track 13-4Resistance and tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics
  • Track 13-5Biofilm community ecology
  • Track 13-6Biofilm-related medical device infections
  • Track 13-7Diversification and evolution in biofilms
  • Track 13-8Biomechanics in biofilms and infection
  • Track 13-9New methods in biofilms and -omics
  • Track 13-10Airway and wound biofilm infections
  • Track 13-11Diagnosis of biofilm infections
  • Track 13-12Regulation of biofilm development
  • Track 13-13Orthopedic biofilm infections
  • Track 14-1Walls and Surfaces
  • Track 14-2Cell to cell communication
  • Track 14-3Bacterial Sensing Networks
  • Track 14-4Alternative Sensing Mechanism
  • Track 14-5Quorum Quenching Enzymes
  • Track 14-6Gram Negative Pathogens
  • Track 14-7Small Molecule Signalling
Environmental microbiology is the study of the composition and physiology of microbial communities in the environment. The environment in this case denotes the soil, dihydrogen monoxide, air and sediments covering the planet and can withal include the animals and plants that inhabit these areas. Environmental microbiology withal includes the study of microorganisms that subsist in artificial environments such as bioreactors. Molecular biology has revolutionized the study of microorganisms in the environment and amended our construal of the composition, phylogeny, and physiology of microbial communities. The current molecular toolbox encompasses a range of DNA-predicated technologies and incipient methods for the study of RNA and proteins extracted from environmental samples. Microbial life is astonishingly diverse and microorganisms literally cover the planet. It is estimated that we ken fewer than 1% of the microbial species on Earth. Microorganisms can survive in some of the most extreme environments on the planet and some can survive high temperatures, often above 100°C, as found in geysers, ebony smokers, and oil wells. Some are found in very arctic habitats and others in highly salt saline, acidic, or alkaline dihydrogen monoxide. An average gram of soil contains approximately one billion (1,000,000,000) microbes representing probably several thousand species. Microorganisms have special impact on the whole biosphere. They are the backbone of ecosystems of the zones where light cannot approach. In such zones, chemosynthetic bacteria are present which provide energy and carbon to the other organisms there. Some microbes are decomposers which have ability to recycle the nutrients. So, microbes have a special role in biogeochemical cycles. Microbes, especially bacteria, are of great importance in the sense that their symbiotic relationship (either positive or negative) has special effects on the ecosystem.
  • Track 15-1Nutrition: Growth and control of bacteria
  • Track 15-2Thermophily / Pathogenicity
  • Track 15-3Non-coding genome
  • Track 15-4Extremophiles
  • Track 15-5Novel strains and approaches
  • Track 15-6Chromosome dynamics
  • Track 15-7Microbial adhesion and signal transduction
  • Track 15-8Metabolism and metabolic engineering
  • Track 15-9Molecular typing and modern methods
  • Track 15-10Protein Synthesis and translational control
  • Track 15-11Molecular Biology of Cyanobacteria
  • Track 15-12Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology
  • Track 15-13Bacterial biochemical physiology
  • Track 15-14Microbial metabolism and genetics
  • Track 15-15Bacterial taxonomy and phylogeny
San Francisco, More than 50,000 people die in the U.S each year from diseases that could have been prevented with a simple vaccine. Influenza is by far the biggest killer, but there are also regular outbreaks of measles, meningitis, and pertussis. Ebola virus and Pertussis (or whooping cough) is currently epidemic in California. Unvaccinated people can spread disease to other adults and the children too young to be immunized. These are the some of the Global market research analysis for Vaccines approved by BCC. Global revenue for vaccine technologies was nearly $31.8 billion in 2011. This market is expected to increase from $33.6 billion in 2012 to $43.4 billion in 2017, for DNA vaccines was valued at $305.3 million in 2014, and further to $2.7 billion by 2019, influenza market will grow from nearly $6 billion in 2018. The protein therapeutics market is expected to decline to $136.7 billion in 2013 and then increase to nearly $179.1 billion in 2018, for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying products is expected to grow to nearly $14.2 billion in 2018. The global protein therapeutics market is expected to decline to $136.7 billion in 2013 and then increase to nearly $179.1 billion in 2018, a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.6% over the five-year period from 2013 to 2018.
  • Track 16-1Broad spectrum antibiotics and current development
  • Track 16-2Rotavirus and Pneumococcal vaccines
  • Track 16-3Food safety and glyco-conjugate vaccines
  • Track 16-4Antiviral and antibacterial vaccines
  • Track 16-5Synthetic vitamins, nutraceuticals and functional foods
  • Track 16-6Broad spectrum antibiotics and current development
  • Track 16-7
  • Track 16-8
  • Track 16-9
  • Track 16-10
  • Track 16-11Broad spectrum antibiotics and current development
  • Track 16-12Plant and animal based vaccines
  • Track 16-13Clinical disinfectants
  • Track 16-14Fungal infections and anti-fungal therapeutics
  • Track 16-15Antiviral drugs and viral resistance
  • Track 16-16Mycotoxins and phycotoxins
  • Track 16-17Antiretroviral therapy and current research on HIV/AIDS
  • Track 16-18Advancements in pharmaceutical microbiology
  • Track 16-19Antimicrobial Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic modelling and simulation
  • Track 16-20Nanopatches and nanovaccination
  • Track 16-21Natural vs. synthetic antimicrobials
  • Track 16-22Bacteriocins and their significance
  • Track 16-23Anti-microbial coatings
  • Track 16-24Fungal infections and anti-fungal therapeutics
Systems biology is the computational and mathematical modelling of complex biological systems. Systems biology has been responsible for some of the most important developments in the science of human health and environmental sustainability. It is a holistic approach to deciphering the complexity of biological systems that starts from the understanding that the networks that form the whole of living organisms are more than the sum of their parts. It is collaborative, integrating many scientific disciplines – biology, computer science, engineering, bioinformatics, physics and others – to predict how these systems change over time and under varying conditions, and to develop solutions to the world’s most pressing health and environmental issues. Systems biology, ultimately, creates the potential for entirely new kinds of exploration, and drives constant innovation in biology-based technology and computation.
  • Track 17-1Bioinformatics: Sequence and genome analysis
  • Track 17-2Microbial genetics
  • Track 17-3Microbial evolution and phylogenetics
  • Track 17-4Diagnosis and management of viral hepatitis
  • Track 17-5Comparitive genomics
  • Track 17-6Metagenomics
  • Track 17-7Systems biology of host-microbiome interactions
  • Track 17-8Interplay between host ecology and viral evolution
  • Track 17-9Single cell genomics and proteomics
  • Track 17-10Mathematical models for infectious disease dynamics
  • Track 17-11Microarray expression analysis
  • Track 17-12Genomics and epidemiological surveillance of bacterial pathogens
  • Track 17-13Microbial functional genomics
  • Track 17-14Genome evolution and environmental genomics
Medical microbiology is a branch of medicine concerned with the aversion, diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. In integration, this field of science studies sundry clinical applications of microbes for the amelioration of health. There are four kinds of microorganisms that cause infectious disease: bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses and one type of infectious protein called a prion. Medical microbiologists often make treatment recommendations to the patient’s medico predicated on the strain of microbe and its antibiotic resistances, the site of infection, the potential toxicity of antimicrobial drugs and any drug allergies the patient has. Medical microbiology is not only about diagnosing and treating disease; it additionally involves the study of benign microbes. Microbes have been shown to be subsidiary in combating infectious disease and promoting health. Treatments can be developed from microbes, as demonstrated by Alexander Fleming's revelation of penicillin as well as the development of incipient antibiotics from the bacterial genus Streptomyces among many others. Not only are microorganisms a source of antibiotics but some may withal act as probiotics to provide health benefits to the host, such as providing better gastrointestinal health or inhibiting pathogens.
  • Track 18-1Host-pathogen interactions
  • Track 18-2Antimicrobial Peptides: Mechanism, function and application
  • Track 18-3Biodefense and emerging diseases
  • Track 18-4Mycobacterium tuberculosis : Prevention and control
  • Track 18-5Bacterial and fungal skin infections
  • Track 18-6Hematological malignancies
  • Track 18-7Staphylococcal Diseases
  • Track 18-8Innate Immunity and determinants of microbial pathogenesis
  • Track 18-9Liver infections: Diagnosis of hepatitis and control
  • Track 18-10Gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections
  • Track 18-11Immunity: Response, evasion, and tolerance
  • Track 18-12Zoonoses and control
  • Track 18-13Travel medicine, tropical and parasitic diseases